350% Increase In Murders In St James, Where Are The Calls To Fire Antony Anderson?

Yesterday I wrote an arti­cle that was less than com­pli­men­ta­ry of the Jamaican Prime Minister and his han­dling of the Nation’s crime-fight­ing strategy.
I want to con­tin­ue address­ing the island’s crime surge today with the same clear-eyed focus I tried to use in the January 27th article.
https://​mike​beck​les​.com/​t​o​-​t​h​o​s​e​-​w​h​o​-​s​a​i​d​-​t​a​k​i​n​g​-​o​u​t​-​m​u​r​d​e​r​e​r​s​-​h​a​s​-​n​o​t​-​w​o​r​k​e​d​-​h​o​w​-​i​s​-​r​o​l​l​i​n​g​-​o​v​e​r​-​a​n​d​-​s​u​r​r​e​n​d​e​r​i​n​g​-​w​o​r​k​i​n​g​-​f​o​r​-​y​ou/.
For decades, the two polit­i­cal par­ties that rule Jamaica have done noth­ing to advance the coun­try’s rule of law. In fact, they have advanced mea­sures that have expo­nen­tial­ly cement­ed a cul­ture of crim­i­nal­i­ty that lit­er­al­ly tran­scends any police depart­men­t’s abil­i­ty to erad­i­cate, least of all, the poor­ly trained, poor­ly equipped, poor­ly paid, and super­vised JCF.
Members of the two polit­i­cal par­ties have been sur­ro­gates for dan­ger­ous crim­i­nals and still are today.
They send cop-killers away in the dead of night. They encour­age mem­bers of their con­stituen­cies to demon­strate against the police. They get involved in police inves­ti­ga­tions; they encour­age puni­tive mea­sures against decent police offi­cers who try to do their jobs; of course, this is only pos­si­ble because the lead­er­ship of the JCF has been slav­ish lap­dogs, always look­ing to serve their mas­ters for a pat on the back. Members of the two par­ties have been con­nect­ed to gang­land activ­i­ties, includ­ing the mur­der of Jamaican citizens.
It is impos­si­ble then to have a coun­try where the rule of law is respect­ed when the head of the stream is as filth and cor­rupt­ed as that which exists in our country.

It ought to come as no sur­prise that, accord­ing to [Transparency International, our beau­ti­ful lit­tle island con­tin­ue to be one of the most cor­rupt nations on earth.
In fact, a recent report indi­cates that Jamaica is the Caribbean’s fifth most cor­rupt coun­try. In Transparency’s lat­est report, for the year 2020, Jamaica inched up from a score of 43 to 44 out of 100, in a con­text where zero is deemed very cor­rupt, and 100 is very clean.
In sim­ple terms, Jamaica has­n’t even yet reached the halfway mark away from the worst cor­rup­tion indi­ca­tor, which is zero.
This ought to give us some per­spec­tive as we pon­der the entrenched crim­i­nal­i­ty wash­ing over the tiny island of 2.8 mil­lion people.
Members of par­lia­ment dou­ble as defense lawyers to vio­lent mur­der­ers. They leave the court­room then head over to Gordon house to leg­is­late on the nation’s vio­lent crime rate.
To say that this is uneth­i­cal is to state the obvi­ous. To accept the con­flict of inter­est inher­ent in this kind of prac­tice is to begin to under­stand the com­plex lev­el of cor­rup­tion which brought Jamaica to the point where the Island is tee­ter­ing on the brink of becom­ing a failed state.

As we plug into those real­i­ties, we see the con­se­quences of these entrenched yet unad­dressed issues. It is no won­der then that since the start of 2021, the Parish of Saint James has seen an increase of 350 per­cent in mur­ders against the pre­vi­ous year.
Saint James may be expe­ri­enc­ing the largest increase in vio­lent crime, but it is not the only Parish expe­ri­enc­ing a surge in vio­lence. The shock­ing uptick of mur­ders in the Island’s tourism mec­ca has gone on unabat­ed; it is a pre­cise met­ric of the coun­try’s fail­ure to get its arms around this crime monster.
Pride and arro­gance will cause us to lose this once pearl of the Caribbean; igno­rance, and pre­tense are citadels of defense against the strate­gies that would inex­orably begin to turn the hell­ish crime mon­ster around.
Like pour­ing water into a bas­ket, they con­tin­ue to nib­ble around the edges. They con­tin­ue to admin­is­ter band-aids to gun­shot wounds, while con­sol­ing the casu­al­ty with plat­i­tudes, even as he bleeds to death.
Braggadocio’s pre-writ­ten state­ments of resolve, a reac­tionary show of force, only to pull back because of its unsus­tain­abil­i­ty, are noth­ing if not comical.

In pre­vi­ous years the thing to do would be to fire the Commissioner of Police. Blaming the vic­tim worked up until they paint­ed them­selves into a cor­ner that belies every­thing they told the coun­try before.
Previous com­mis­sion­ers who came up through the ranks were inca­pable of doing the job they were trained to do, so they had to bring in peo­ple from outside.
Of course, those out­siders had to come from the fix-it sad sack army with its own moun­tain of prob­lems with crim­i­nal­i­ty, but I digress. I am real­ly not look­ing to burst any star­ry-eyed bub­ble that may still exist about the Army’s pro­fes­sion­al­ism. Not today.
So this is their gold­en boy, for­mer head of the Military, intel­li­gent, with the let­ters to match, not taint­ed by the squad­die men­tal­i­ty; what’s not to like?
Only that he has presided over the worst increas­es in homi­cides and oth­er vio­lent crimes in the nation’s history.
So what now? What is the sto­ry now, crickets?
Why are there no calls for the res­ig­na­tion of Anthony Anderson? I’ll tell you, they knew that chang­ing Commissioners of police would do noth­ing to alle­vi­ate ris­ing crime, but they need­ed a scapegoat.
Moving around deck chairs on the sink­ing Titanic will do noth­ing to stop the ship from sink­ing; who exact­ly were they fooling?

Having shone a lit­tle light on cau­sa­tion, let’s now pro­vide a few solutions.
(1)Watered down laws do noth­ing to deter crim­i­nals. Pass laws that send clear mes­sages to vio­lent offend­ers that if you com­mit mur­der, you will not see the light of day.
(2) Remove for­eign-fund­ed groups from the leg­isla­tive table. No oth­er nation allows so-called human rights lob­by a seat at the table, much less allow them to dic­tate legislation.
(3) Law ‑Enforcement is not always pret­ty; some­times it gets messy. Allow the police to do their jobs with­in the frame­work of the law. When they vio­late their oath, hold them accountable.
(4) Discontinue doing the things I laid out in para­graph one.
(5) Provide the police with the resources they need to get the job done.
(6) Get out of the way of the Police.

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Mike writes for thinkers.

Mike Beckles is a for­mer Police Detective, busi­ness­man, free­lance writer, a black achiev­er hon­oree, and pub­lish­er of the blog mike​beck​les​.com.