How Many Billions Will Blacks Blow Outside Our Communities This Holiday Season?

I have long har­bored the belief that the true racial har­mo­ny many Americans long for will be best real­ized when all eth­nic groups’ eco­nom­ic advance­ment is realized.
How do we attain eco­nom­ic inde­pen­dence in a coun­try where the gap between the haves and the have-nots is widen­ing by the day? We will get to that in due course, but in the mean­time, it is impor­tant to con­sid­er that the respect that those at the bot­tom crave, will not be gained by beg­ging for it, demand­ing it, demon­strat­ing for it; it has to be earned.
Being at the bot­tom of the eco­nom­ic lad­der, African-Americans have the most to gain by chang­ing how we han­dle what­ev­er eco­nom­ic resources we possess.
Yet, for some strange rea­son, more than any oth­er racial group, we seem to have set a course toward the total and com­plete eco­nom­ic empow­er­ment of every­one but ourselves.
Last Year the black com­mu­ni­ty spent some­where between 1.1 & 1.3 tril­lion dol­lars on con­sumer goods and ser­vices; hard­ly any mon­ey was spent sup­port­ing black businesses.
And so I believe that as long as black peo­ple con­tin­ue to spend a few bucks in black hair­dress­ing salons and bar­ber­shops, then dress up in clothes with Italian design­er names, to go out to eat at Italian, Chinese, and oth­er peo­ple’s restau­rants, then spend the night in hotels, none of which is owned by us, we will for­ev­er be at the bot­tom of the eco­nom­ic ladder.

https://​mike​beck​les​.com/​e​c​o​n​o​m​i​c​-​p​o​w​e​r​-​t​h​e​-​f​i​x​-​t​o​-​r​a​c​i​s​m​-​i​n​-​a​m​e​r​i​ca/

Money is pow­er; we can pre­tend all we want that we can pla­cate oth­ers by being servile and ami­able, but the truth is that mon­ey is what mat­ters in this country.
I am not mak­ing a case for a cap­i­tal­is­tic approach to every­thing we do.
What I am allud­ing to is the dis­tinct real­i­ty that when we have none of the ameni­ties to sus­tain life, when we have to go out­side our com­mu­ni­ty to pur­chase the goods and ser­vices we require, we will for­ev­er be at the mer­cy of the peo­ple to whom we con­tin­ue to give our money.
If we are stuck beg­ging peo­ple to let us eat at their restau­rants, instead of own­ing and patron­iz­ing our own, no one will take us seriously.
If we con­tin­ue to spend every cent we earn in depart­ment stores and on web­sites buy­ing Italian design­er clothes and acces­sories, even though( we set fash­ion trends), we will for­ev­er be mar­ket­ed to, for our mon­ey. At the same time, we receive no respect for our con­tri­bu­tion to their growth.
As long as we con­tin­ue to drink expen­sive cham­pagne man­u­fac­tured by peo­ple who say they did not cre­ate it for us, when we make work boots fash­ion­able and expen­sive, and spend our last dol­lar on expen­sive gam­ing machines, games, and oth­er para­pher­na­lia, we will con­tin­ue to be a well-lubri­cat­ed con­duit for mon­ey, pre­cious­ly lit­tle of which will stick to our community.

Last year accord­ing to the Organization of American History, the Black Lives Matter Movement (BLM), Los Angeles chap­ter, tweet­ed: “We’re dream­ing of a #BlackXmas.” For the sec­ond year, the move­ment lever­aged black buy­ing pow­er — now over one tril­lion dol­lars — and the Christmas hol­i­day to chal­lenge white cap­i­tal­ism and suprema­cy, the prin­ci­pal caus­es of racial and eco­nom­ic inequal­i­ties and state-sanc­tioned vio­lence against black peo­ple. African Americans were urged to with­hold their dol­lars from “white cor­po­ra­tions” and instead “donate to Black-led orga­ni­za­tions that are build­ing new, lib­er­a­to­ry struc­tures in our communities…in the names of your loved ones as their [hol­i­day] gifts.” If shop­pers want­ed to par­take in the hol­i­day shop­ping rit­u­al, they were encour­aged to pur­chase from black-owned retail­ers.

https://​mike​beck​les​.com/​b​l​a​c​k​-​d​o​l​l​a​r​-​f​l​e​e​-​b​u​t​-​t​o​-​w​h​e​re/

There are many more star­tups today than when I start­ed writ­ing on this issue; I wish them well. Nevertheless, though the idea of more star­tups is incred­i­bly excit­ing to watch, I won­der whether many are being done extem­po­ra­ne­ous­ly and with­out the req­ui­site finan­cial back­ing nec­es­sary to with­stand the grow­ing pains?
I am par­tic­u­lar­ly hope­ful at the prospect that online busi­ness­es have of sur­viv­ing, if they can afford to weath­er the storm of exor­bi­tant web-host­ing fees, tech sup­port, and the host of oth­er chal­lenges that comes with online mar­ket­ing, not the least of which are stiff and volu­mi­nous competition.
The fact that con­sumers do not know the col­or of black site owners/​operators may be a net pos­i­tive for those busi­ness own­ers in the long run.
My fer­vent hope is that more and more African-Americans will begin to embrace the idea that black busi­ness own­er­ship is tied to our finan­cial empowerment.
It is a sim­ple con­cept that goes like this; when we get busy in our own lives, run­ning our restau­rants, banks, bar­ber­shops, hair salons, hotels, real­ty com­pa­nies, con­struc­tion com­pa­nies, tax pro­cess­ing firms, movie-mak­ing com­pa­nies„ tele­vi­sion net­works, peo­ple will see what we are doing, and they will come a‑knocking.
It is not a nov­el con­cept; it is what every oth­er eth­nic group in America is busy doing.

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Mike Beckles is a for­mer Police Detective, busi­ness­man, free­lance writer, a black achiev­er hon­oree, and pub­lish­er of the blog mike​beck​les​.com. 
He’s con­tributed to sev­er­al websites.
You may sub­scribe to his blogs, or sub­scribe to his Youtube chan­nel @chatt-a-box, for the lat­est videos.

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